Architecture

“The feeling is that the museum will be quietly inserted into a void within the forest,” explains architect John Patkau. “It will be recessive and restrained in its visual presence.”

Designed by John and Patricia Patkau, David Shone and their firm Patkau Architects of Vancouver, British Columbia, the Audain Art Museum is nestled in a grove of Englemann and Sitka Spruce hybrids and was designed to integrate seamlessly into its surroundings. “The feeling is that the museum will be quietly inserted into a void within the forest,” explains architect John Patkau.”It will be recessive and restrained in its visual presence.”

Patkau Architect’s design features a main section for the art collection of Michael Audain and his wife Yoshiko, as well as a wing for temporary exhibits. The main section is two levels, with the first floor featuring 1,300 square meters (14,000 square feet) of exhibition space. The temporary exhibition wing is 557 square meters (6,000 square feet) and boasts a ceiling that will soar in places up to 9 metres (30 feet) in height.

“We ended up choosing the Patkaus based on their very extensive knowledge of art galleries and public art museums. And also, of course, their track record is illustrious,” notes Audain.